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Studies Show

Well, one study.

One study shows that one out of every twelve chickens is insane.

Walkabout gets out. E throws her back. She gets out again. I know because they all circle around to the Olympic side of their fence when I go out on the deck. Good eyesight on those chickens. Or one of them. Because what one does, the others do. And Walkabout also circled around, but on the outside of the fence. I wasn't ready to come down from the mountain, so I went back inside. An hour later, I went back out and everyone was in the run where they belonged. Walkabout had put herself back.

But being Walkabout, she seems to have gone out again. Because when it was almost completely dark and I went down to close them in for the night, there she was, coming to the gate to meet me. I had a flashlight with me. She followed the light this time. I turned on the lights in the barn itself. She liked this and began to explore the barn, showing no interest in getting inside the coop. I finally had to corral her in a corner and show her the door to her coop. At which point she did hop inside, but then started to eat. No concern for roosting at all. Certifiable.

One hesitates to anthropomorphize (does one?), but she clearly takes a path of least resistance. If God will come down and put you back in, why do all the work of flying? If your personal experience with God (remember, she's a Deist) indicates that God will ensure you are not left out in the dark, well, then, you have only to be a bit patient and God will appear and take care of you.

Can she learn that God helps those who help themselves? Or has she already done so?

Frog Out

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Comments

( 5 comments — Leave a comment )
rachel_swirsky
Jan. 15th, 2007 02:46 pm (UTC)
This might be terribly ignorant, but I always wonder why you don't clip her wings.
birdhousefrog
Jan. 15th, 2007 10:28 pm (UTC)
See the post on Jan 3 "The Coop as Convent" for the quotes on ways to keep chickens from flying. Clipping is a temporary measure, as opposed to the much more drastic measures also described. And I'm pretty certain it would hurt her, let alone the consequences in her own coop.

Her roost is 4 rungs high and the girls use their wings to balance when they jump up at night and then they fly down to the ground in the morning. (Use #1) In an emergency situation, more than one of the girls will take wing, getting them into a tree or over a fence and away from a predator. Predators have gotten into their run in the past. (Use #2)

And I just think it's unfair to make her offbalance on one side.

So I live with an insane chicken. Who I wish would put herself back in her coop ALL the time, not just once in a while.

It's sort of like having a kid. And then again, it's not.

Oz
rachel_swirsky
Jan. 16th, 2007 03:21 pm (UTC)
Thanks for explaining. I was thinking of my parakeets, I guess. :)
birdhousefrog
Jan. 16th, 2007 03:27 pm (UTC)
wow. clip parakeets? on both wings or just one? To reduce flight or eliminate it? I thought parakeets flying around the house was kind of a neat idea. Can they still get up on their swing and stuff? Does it just keep them from getting frantic in a cage and hurting themselves?

Most commercial chickens it would make total sense to clip them. But these girls are 'free range' and not kept in a little box. And they're pets. They forage a lot. We have to keep moving the temporary fencing around.

Oz
rachel_swirsky
Jan. 16th, 2007 03:31 pm (UTC)
Well, I had a parakeet when I was 10 or so, but as I recall clipping both wings inhibited long distance flight, but not short distance flight. He could hop from perch to perch, but not fly out a window.

We kept him in a cage and put the cats out when we took him out. Uninhibited flight might have been a bad idea with the felines around.
( 5 comments — Leave a comment )