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Cloud Walking

Ground fog on the 5 acre field. Cirrus pulled down from the sky, drifting like a helium balloon some 3 feet off the ground. I see myself walking through it, pushing through the misty layers, washing my face with cloud moisture in the early morning light. Cobwebs in my head, cloud cobwebs in the field that the sun's heat will dissipate in short order.

E and I see a heron flying low over the field, headed from one pond to another. We don't see them this far inland very often. E finds a slug and points it out to me.

J hits a (dead) deer. For more than 4 years of driving to the train at approx. 5 am, he has avoided every deer except the one that kicked in his headlight as it went by. He sees their eyes everywhere, points them out to me in our field at night as we come up the driveway. He is deer-focused. But what are you going to do when the deer is lying in the road and you're traveling at 60 mph? You're not going to swerve, there's a deep ditch and no shoulder on each side. Take it with a tire or straddle it. He straddled it. His car has a 6 inch clearance. Car no go. The mechanic has spent the last 2 days picking deer pieces out of the undercarriage. It smells. I know, I smelled it when it was fresh and I was waiting for a tow truck. It attracts flies. If we flipped it over, it would attract vultures and they would pick it clean for us. Much faster than the flies. Failing that, a carwash that washes underneath is needed. Several times. $1,000 later, the car goes again. But it still smells. I haven't smelled it yet myself, but the mechanic assures me it still does. J wants points for hitting a deer. I say, no, your record is still a perfect game. Someone else's kill does not count. They were very inconsiderate to hit a deer at 3 am and leave it in the road for you. Unless the deer wasn't actually dead but providing some weird deer performance art. In the road. Lying down. Just over a rise. At 4:30 in the morning.

J also sees poison ivy when he closes his eyes at night, but that's a different story related to the height of summer, not the early fall rutting season for scuzzy deer. His battles with scuzzy deer and poison ivy are much the same intensity. One target moves. One doesn't. But both pop up everywhere in his path.

The snake survived the trip to school, thank goodness. The poor thing had itself tied in knots when I released it that afternoon. I had to straighten it out and point it towards the pachysandra. The next day I heard jays after something in a tree again. Snakes are not particularly bright. I went out and told the jays to mind their own business somewhere else.

One of the headlines going through my head has been: The grass laughs. Now it's The Grass Laughs No More. I did an hour of mowing yesterday, all the areas where I walk. However, J, the meteorologist, informs me it will rain today. Sigh. I left the bagger half full because I was going to finish the paddock today. Now it's something of a race. Will the grass dry out to be mowed before the rain makes it wet again? I still have 2/3 of the mowing left to do.

And a house to clean. My work group meets here tonight. The house gets cleaned every 2 weeks this way. The vacuum died. I bought a new one, very expensive investment. Such a deal, they told me. We make you very, very good deal. Later I checked the internet. It was list price. However, this vacuum never sells at much of a discount. I might have saved $20 online, no more. And it wouldn't have shipped in time for tonight's meeting. Such a deal. Frankly, I don't need deals. I just need a fair price. I made my decision based on the final price offer, not based on how much of a deal it was. Culturally, that's how I work. Culturally, that's how the proprietor worked. We give you good tradein for (dead) vacuum.

I was too slow making the bed this morning. The fat cat had already discovered the down quilt all crumpled up and nest-like. I'm not buying that purr. Gently place cat on floor. Make bed. Invite cat back up. Cat deigns.

Dog and I make interesting trails in the dew this morning in the new mown grass, which looks awesome, thank you very much. Dog pees on side of chicken run. Good for him. That will make the fox think twice.

It was chilly and I warmed my fingers around a newly laid egg as I put out feed for the girls.
Frog Out

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( 3 comments — Leave a comment )
birdhousefrog
Sep. 28th, 2006 06:12 pm (UTC)
update
Note to self:
Always empty half-empty bagger. Clippings begin to compost even overnight. I have nasty grass stains under my fingernails from digging grass out of the bagger on the first load. Warm, wet, composting grass with an amazing aroma of earth and microbes, spiced with seasonal onion grass clippings and moldy leaves.
michaeljasper
Sep. 29th, 2006 01:44 am (UTC)
The Grass Laughs: An Epic Fantasy Trilogy.

I can see it. I'd read it.

Lovely entry, right up to paragraph 3. :)
birdhousefrog
Sep. 29th, 2006 02:12 am (UTC)
that's what I get for not blogging for 4 days. Too much 'news' I want to record and I get my funny stuff mixed up with my fantastical stuff. I should edit and put the line about warming my fingers with an egg back up where the heron is. And let the deer lie. In the middle of the road. So to speak.

Oz
( 3 comments — Leave a comment )